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20121205
20121213
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if you get a fiscal cliff deal, it will be mildly inflationary. that may actually raise rates, even if the fed keeps buying bonds. we actually need to see rates up in order to get real excited about the banks. >> that's a good point. we continue to watch facebook. flirting with 28. and apple here at $5.40. we'll see how it manages that resistance. bob pisani is on the floor with more. >> still talking about the fiscal cliff and how little reaction we'll get with the markets. up 60 points in the dow right now. there's no particular worry out there. they believe that a deal is going to happen. if you look at the vix, for example, not only are they not moving, they're not moving out of any range, but they're moving in an even tighter spread than they normally do. the relationship between vix and vix futures is squashed down. this is the deal, the republicans will agree to tax increases, and very quickly this week we'll turn to debate on what kind of spending cuts there's going to be, and dealing with entitlements. they believe a deal is coming, we'll see. i espoused this a couple of we
some sort of fiscal cliff deal together. ayman, you've been tweeting this morning already about some characterizations about the discussions between the speaker and the president in recent days. >> that's right. a republican source told nbc news that the conversation that the president and speaker had on the phone yesterday, lasted for only 15 minutes, and they described it as, quote, tense, unquote. and that may have something to do with the fact that the president lowered his request in his latest proposal to the house republicans from $1.6 trillion in new tax revenues to $1.4 trillion. clearly as you can see here, the republicans don't think that's enough. they want the president to come out publicly now with some specific spending cuts. now, there's some question whether or not behind the scenes the president has offered significant spending cuts. the president says yes, the house republicans say no. they say the democrats have taken so much off the table that all that's left there is the varnish. there's clearly a gloomy assessment here in washington, carl. >> ayman, we'll be co
on that in a moment. >> investment banks paralyzed by the fiscal cliff. we'll find out what it will take to get deals going once again. >> we expect the president to speak on the fiscal cliff before the business roundtable. we'll bring you his comments live. citigroup cutting 11,000 jobs taking a billion dollar charge. kayla tausche has more. >> investors see this as a positive. a big move for a new ceo who is just getting his sleeves rolled up. the cuts will span across nearly all of the company's divisions but biggest slice of the pie coming from global consumer banking cutting 6,200 jobs there. the cuts are broad. nearly 2,000 jobs cut from the institutional clients group including investment banking six times the layoffs reported to take place in the securities business earlier this month. jim cramer said earlier that it feels like citigroup has been cutting jobs forever but that's because the bank has downsized by a third since peak employment in 2007. most of that cutting took place after he took the reigns. it will have 261,000 jobs once these cuts are done. the 11,000 announced today is a big
, maria bartiromo holding their feet to the fire about where they stand on the fiscal cliff and how they'll do their part to rise above partisan politics and reach a deal. now, there are some bowles comments. 40%, yeah, but the odds are much better. they're still 35% chance it will not happen. it's not exactly confidence building. >> not necessarily confidence building. always interesting to me how people can put percentage chances on anything like this. seeing how difficult it is and how the story changes to a certain steextent each day. who knows what's going to happen. >> public care, confidence numbers, spending, any relationship to the fiscal cliff at five. >> i don't know. i just don't know. i think anecdotally, from what i have been able to observe, no. but i can't speak for that. the journal today has the lead stories of consumer spending starting so slow. and in part, they cite the fiscal cliff. i think if you were out there, you would get answers that would not necessarily describe it correctly. >> it's a shame it's called fiscal cliff. and called radical tax increase. it was m
. important thing moving on about the fiscal cliff. the biggest story passed around here this morning was the politico article where they finally put a name on making a deal. the 37% solution, just split the difference between 35.6% and 39.6% increasing taxes and call it the 37% solution. that's the article everybody's been passing around today. on apple, just a quick note on apple here, there was as many notes out as there were analysts on apple. the main point on it is that most agree is that concern on iphone sales are the number one problem. att made a comment yesterday, that basically sales were the same as last year than the first sales of the --. a lot of t back to you guys. >> actually, i would be encouraged if i were an apple shareholder that the stock actually opened down today. if there's any hope. italian bonds getting hit today too. of course worth keeping track of. okay, let's shift the bonds into dollars. >> we're going to stick with that european theme and when bob pisani says central banks and activism in the same sen tes, i still have good bumps, they're not good goo
halfway there earlier this morning before the speaker began his comments. if the fiscal cliff has you nervous, this may be some relaxing news. as of midnight last night, washington is now the first state in the united states to legalize marijuana for adult recreational use, but the law is not without complications. jane wells is live in l.a. with more on that story. good morning, jane. >> hi, carl. lighting up in seattle is one thing. figuring out how these laws are going to work is another. pot possession may be legal in washington, but it will be another year before the state sets up the bureaucracy, creating a network of legal growers and retailers. they're going to have to set standards for thc. but what about pricing? the state is hoping to raise $600 million a year for pot and they say it could add 5% to gross state product by 2017. but ktlu reports the state's office of finance management says retail prices and medical pot clinics are already $3er gram higher than street prices and you add in taxes. are people going to pay more if they can get it for less. and in colorado, its
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6